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The Daily Quote: Intro to Southern Grammar

Ya’llyall_other

It’s a word we love (or love to hate). For me, it’s just part of the lingo I grew up on.

Meaning: You all.

It’s a staple to Southern speaking. It makes sentences roll off our tongues, smooth like butter. Any time we can take a multi-syllable word or phrase & cut it down to one, or two…that’s Winning.

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You all = Y’all.

Are not/ Am not/ Is not = Ain’t.

Mind you, using these particular words will not afford you good marks academically, as use of Southern grammar is generally frowned upon in academic & professional settings & applications.

But I, for one, say, there ain’t nothin’ wrong with kickin’ your shoes off, lettin’ your hair down, & talkin’ the way you like when you get home with your kinda folk.

I’m a Southern gal, but I’ve gotten used to putting the proper endings on my words & not adding or subtracting syllables in the workplace. I call it my “Ohio” accent. Where the word ‘pie’ always rhymes with ‘eye.’  As a nurse, I want my patients to be at ease & confident in my knowledge & abilities. I don’t want people to double check to see if I have teeth & shoes on because of the way I talk. (I know, that is very politically incorrect). I’m edu-ma-cated, as we playfully say. As funny & as common as some of those “Kentucky” & “Country folk” stereotypes may be, I must say, don’t let our accents fool you. A Southern accent is in no way a reflection of one’s intelligence. Some people choose to adapt & train themselves to speak more “properly” or “professionally,” & others don’t. I know plenty of teachers, even some doctors & other nurses who have Southern accents.

Bless your heart. ❤ Y’all come back now…ya hear?