The Daily Quote: Why Eating Insects Makes Sense

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Photo courtesy theidleman.com 

 

I’ve been thinking a lot lately about what I would do to feed my family should all of this shopping I’ve been doing all of my life – this store-to-table hunting & gathering & swiping of the debit card should all fall apart in an apocalyptic mess. Have you ever given thought to what you would do should a massive epidemic of disease destroy the meat industry as we know it?
” Bugs could be a solution for food shortages in the future. “
– Bill Broadbent, bugsfordinner.com
This past summer, I noticed the almost nuisance-level abundance of crickets in my yard & covering my house in the cool flower bed beneath my windows. For only a few seconds, I considered catching a few & frying them up with some cumin & garlic or chili oil just to be able to say I did it. I knew it would be harmless, as I don’t treat my lawn, & people in other countries commonly eat crickets.
That thought returned to me as I was online, searching for sources of nutrition that could help me lose weight & improve my overall nutrition & health. I have a rather sedentary job, & have had a lot of fatigue & pain due to other health conditions. All of the health shakes & meal replacement drinks that I’ve found in stores contain too much sugar and/or sodium. They cost too much. Then I’m left with plastic bottles to recycle, & to be honest – I don’t pay extra for recycling with my trash pickup.
So as I was researching online for foods with the most nutrition for my buck, I ended up looking at high-quality sources protein.
That led me to: vMealworms, including a very cool kickstarter campaign called LIVIN Farms Hive for a company that makes & sells countertop mealworm “hives.”
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Complete with recipes & online tutorials to help you make mealworms a real staple food in your household. I was fascinated. At the time this article was written, they had raised $89K of their $100K goal. There are videos of the hive, how it works, & even cooking videos. I think it looks pleasant & maintainable, & the recipes actually look delish!
My search for places to buy insect “grub” online (no pun intended), led me to a site called, Bugs for Dinner.
The information provided by this site makes an even more compelling argument as to why I should be eating insect protein. Here are a few statistics:
  • Crickets provide more protein & less fat than both beef & salmon (g/kg)
  • It only takes 1% of the water to raise & produce crickets as compared to raising cattle, etc. With water crises on the rise in places like California, we should be aware of the agricultural (specifically dairy farming) industry’s consumption of our water while people’s consumption becomes limited in times of shortage. See this article for more information.
  • Insects are high in protein, vitamins, & minerals & need no antibiotics or other drugs to raise.
  • It costs a fraction of a percentage to raise insects & you can do it – AT HOME – as compared to the expense of raising other animals for meat.
  • Crickets produce 1.5% of the methane produced by cattle & other livestock.

This site features a store, where you can buy sample packs of insect snacks such as bbq, honey mustard, or curry flavored crickets…& yes, they even come chocolate covered. There’s a fantastic information-packed blog, for those who want to learn more about folks who eat insects & why, statistics & nutritional data on sustainable insect protein, delicious recipes, & so much more. There’s even a place to inquire about becoming a bug farmer.

To say the least, I’m intrigued & willing to try adding some bugs to my diet. Here’s a great article on Smithsonian.com on 5 ways to get started.

Another great read: What happens to your body when you eat bugs.